Pat Wahler

Penning stories to savor.

Author: Pat Wahler (page 1 of 4)

The Mother of Thanksgiving

The scent of a turkey roasting in the oven.  Mashed potatoes covered with home-made gravy that melts in your mouth. Cinnamon-sweetened pumpkin pie served with plenty of fresh whipped cream. These are only a few of the delights offered by one of our country’s most decadent culinary events.

Thanksgiving is a mere eight days away and most of us are scurrying to stock up on the supplies necessary to create America’s annual traditional feast.

While the idea may have originated from the pilgrims – even though their meal looked far different from what is served today – it took the efforts of a woman to formally establish the tradition.

Sarah Josepha Hale, Mother of Thanksgiving. (Wikipedia, Public Domain)

Known as the Mother of Thanksgiving, Sarah Josepha Hale lobbied for the creation of a national holiday dedicated to giving thanks. Sarah, an accomplished and prolific writer, became editor of the most influential journal of its day, Godey’s Ladies Book, a position she held for forty years. Sarah wrote many editorials championing the idea of establishing Thanksgiving as a national holiday before playing her most important card on September 28, 1862. With America in the midst of the horrors of the Civil War, she wrote a letter to President Lincoln asking him to make Thanksgiving a national holiday and “permanently an American custom and institution”. Lincoln must have agreed, for within a week, an official proclamation was issued setting the observance for the final Thursday in November to “help heal the wounds of the nation”.

In her spare time, (when she wasn’t busy establishing national holidays or editing), Sarah penned books, poems, and articles; she advocated on behalf of women’s education, encouraged the publication of American writers, campaigned for a unified American culture, and promoted the preservation of historical sites. Oh yes, and she wrote “Mary Had a Little Lamb”, too.

Arbiter of fashion, food, and literary delights, thanks to Sarah Josepha Hale. (Public Domain)

I must admit her efforts to make a better America have me feeling like a total slacker, so here’s a gentle reminder from me to you. While you’re gathering ingredients for the holiday meal, please consider picking up a few extra things for your local food pantry. A little can help a lot, and I feel sure Sarah Josepha Hale would nod in approval at your kindness.

Finally, and just in time for Thanksgiving, I’ve posted a new recipe. Click on the Easy-Peasy Recipe tab for a simple and delicious way to prepare sweet potatoes that does NOT involve marshmallows or brown sugar. I think you’ll like it!

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The Day After Halloween and Winner, Winner, Chicken Dinner

Last week I had the pleasure of visiting the Missouri Civil War Museum. I met and chatted with the museum’s director, Mark L. Trout, at length. He inspired me with his passion about preserving information on this crucial time in our country’s history, and he impressed me with his knowledge and plans for the museum’s future.

Here are a few of the exhibits at the Missouri Civil War Museum. (Photo – Missouri Civil War Museum  website)

This wasn’t my first trip to the museum near Jefferson Barracks in St. Louis, and it certainly won’t be my last. They own many artifacts from the war, including clothing, medical instruments, weaponry, and personal effects. Prowling through the exhibits provides a fascinating trip back in time. For those interested in the Civil War, I highly recommend taking a visit. For more information, click HERE.

After leaving the museum, I headed to the monthly meeting of the Civil War Round Table of St. Louis, looking forward to the topic – the history of mourning customs in America. Paula Zalar, the presenter, filled us in on many fascinating tidbits.  According to Ms. Zalar, customs evolved based on the religious beliefs of the time. For example, early Christians hoped for a “good” death, which basically meant a lingering one with at least a moderate amount of suffering (gulp!), giving the person time to repent his/her sins and ready them spiritually for death. As time went on these beliefs were challenged (war may have had something to do with it), and the notion of a “good” death changed.

The romanticism of the latter 19th century  made symbolism increasingly important. People wanted to keep mementos of the deceased that included memorial cards, use of the deceased’s hair in jewelry or other items, and photographs taken of the deceased (some of which were posed to appear as though still alive). Symbolism in grave markers also abounded, using placement of flowers, a rendering of a broken chain, trailing ivy, and other means.

Women bore the brunt of mourning customs in the nineteenth century. Men mostly just had to wear a dark suit, but a woman who lost a husband (which happened a lot during the war) was expected to wear full deep mourning attire for at least two years. To ignore the prescribed expectations would make the widow a social outcast. (Think Scarlett O’Hara when she took her famous dance with Rhett Butler while in deep mourning.) But never fear, a woman didn’t have to wear black and a heavy veil forever. After two years, society allowed her a subdued shade of lilac.

Paula Zalar wore mourning clothes for her presentation which would have been suitable for a widow after two years. (Photo-Civil War Round Table of St. Louis)

Needless to say, mourning customs have continued to evolve, but still much of what we do now is based on early traditions. Ms. Zalar’s talk intrigued many of us enough to seek out additional information. If you’re interested in further reading, (including how Queen Victoria set the standard for mourning), you can start HERE.

Now on to an important announcement.

On October 25, the names of all my subscribers were entered in a random drawing to win a $25 Amazon gift card. The winner has been selected and, drum roll please, her name is – Sioux Roslawski! Congratulations to Sioux and have fun shopping.

If your name wasn’t chosen this time, don’t despair. I’ll be holding another giveaway soon.

Now I’m off to do a little more reading on mourning customs. How appropriate for the day after Halloween.

 

 

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Literary Tricks and Treats

It’s here! There’s color in the leaves, cornflower blue in the sky, and I’m ready to sit in front of a roaring fire pit to sip hot chocolate. The icky-sticky air is gone like a bad penny and the cool delights of fall have arrived. My windows are open and I’ve put on my comfy stretchy sweatpants (no more zippered shorts judging me) along with a lightweight jacket. Bliss.

Because a big chunk of October has been baked by August-like temperatures, you may not realize Halloween is a mere thirteen (yes thirteen!) days away. What? You don’t have a costume yet? Do not fear. I’ve got you covered.

The way I see it there are two options for Halloween. You can dress up with the intent to strike suspicion or fear into the eyes of anyone who sees you.

Circa 1910 hoodlums. Bain News Services/Library of Congress

Or, you can be ever so clever by dressing as a  character from one of your favorite books.

The possibilities are limitless. There are children’s books. There are novels of every genre from mysteries to horror to romance to westerns to historical. You could even pick an author for inspiration and amaze your friends with your witty and fascinating literary knowledge.  In other words, you could dress up as Carrie, or you could be Stephen King.

Mr. Poe, I presume? Pinterest photo.

To  start you thinking, here are some ideas which I found on Pinterest. Click HERE to see many more.

You’ll need an assistant nearby to survive an evening in this ensemble.

Halloween isn’t only for humans. Don’t forget your canine or feline friend. They like to get into the spirit of things too. For example, take a look at Winston portraying the lead character in There Was an Old Sailor. He actually cooperated for the photo. Sort of.

Ah, the delights of the season. Hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

Yo-ho-ho.

One final reminder! I’ll be drawing a winner on October 25 (one week from today) for a $25 Amazon gift card from my list of subscribers. If you haven’t signed up yet (upper right hand box), it’s not too late.

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Hello to My Old Friend October

The sky is a clear deep blue. The air is crisp and sometimes carries a whiff of smoke from burning brush or a fire pit. The scent of pumpkin, cinnamon, and cloves makes me forget my diet to splurge on a delectable delicacy fresh from the oven.

Pumpkins a’plenty on my porch.

October is here, and I couldn’t be happier – at least I will be when the temperatures become more Octobery and less summery. Yet I have confidence my favorite month will not disappoint. It’s only a matter of time until all the sweet glory of fall delights my heart and soothes my soul. Even my pile of books to read is growing taller. Squirrel-like, I’m hoarding them for long chilly evenings.

In the meantime, there’s no question about October arriving at my house. I’ve put out the pumpkins, some orangeish-yellow mums, a colorful leaf-trimmed wreath, and candles. My Jim Shore Harvest Angels smile benignly down upon the room, presiding over the reds, oranges, and yellows of autumn which have been tucked everywhere.

I’m not a creative decorator, but I can find pretty things and then use them for inspiration. If that sounds like you, I’ve collected some little lovelies and posted them on my Pinterest Holiday Ideas page. Click  HERE to visit the link. Feel free to browse around a bit and maybe find something to help make your house shout (or at least whisper) “Welcome Fall”.

Can you tell I’m a sucker for this beautiful season? It’s time to go forth, decorate, make merry, and enjoy. If you haven’t done so yet, consider this my little nudge to get you moving.

Fall also kicks off the official Eating-Of-All-Things-Delicious. For me this features meals of soups, stews, and chili. October’s Easy-Peasy recipe is one I found for Stuffed Pepper Soup. It’s simple, delicious, and really does remind me of a stuffed pepper (without all the work). Check out the Easy-Peasy tab to find it and enjoy.

Happy October!

P.S. If you haven’t yet become a subscriber, you might want to sign up. As a thank you to my subscribers, I’ll randomly choose one winner for a $25 Amazon gift card as a way to thank you for your support on October 25. H’mm. Maybe you could use it to start another thing I love – getting ready for Christmas. 😉

 

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A Short Book Review and a Thank You to Subscribers

As summer creeps toward fall, I can’t help but get excited. With apologies to those who mourn the end of swimming weather, I’ve been dying to drag out my comfy sweatshirts and deliciously decadent elastic waistband pants. You know the ones I’m talking about. They’re soft and forgiving and don’t pass judgment on me the way snobby slacks with zippers and buttons do.

Another reason to love fall is I tend to read more because there are so many new releases – all in time for the holiday season. My most recent read is THE OTHER EINSTEIN by  Marie Benedict. From Benedict’s well-researched novel, I soon learned Mr. Einstein may have had an amazing intellect, but his treatment of the people closest to him wasn’t exactly stellar.

Poor Mrs. Einstein

According to the novel, he minimized the contributions of fiancee and physicist Mileva Maric to his ground-breaking work, basically stringing her along for years before he agreed to marry her. The life between them wasn’t exactly rosy and I couldn’t help but feel bad for Mileva. Did you ever imagine the wild-haired smiling images we’ve seen of Albert Einstein hid a rather self-absorbed womanizer? Guess you’ll have to read the novel to find out all the fascinating details. I know I’ll never look at him the same way again. This, my friends, is one of the many reasons I love historical fiction – learning things that weren’t taught in any of my history classes.

This photo recently sold for $125,000 at auction. What a guy. (via Getty images)

Now on to more important items.

Subscribers, you are fabulous. As a way to express my gratitude, I plan to periodically run some fun contests exclusively for subscribers. Today I’m launching the first one. So…drum roll please…I’m sponsoring the chance for subscribers to win a $25 Amazon e-gift card – a great way to get started with your holiday shopping.

If you aren’t a subscriber yet, no worries. Just sign up on the top right sidebar under “Become a Subscriber” by entering your email address. You’ll receive notification of new blog posts so you won’t miss future giveaways or exclusive news via email – but never more than twice per month.

A winner will be randomly selected from my list of current subscribers in five weeks, on October 25, 2017. Simple! Since the gift card will be delivered via email, all subscribers are eligible, regardless of geographic location. All that’s necessary is a valid email address.

Once again, thanks to my loyal subscribers. Good luck to each one of you!

 

 

 

 

 

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Got Fall Projects?

It’s true. Fall cleaning really is a “thing”.

I used to believe only in spring did I need to feel guilted into doing the stuff I avoid while trying to make the house look less like a pig-sty (apologies to pigs) while not quite taking it to the level of say, waiting for a photographer from Better Homes and Gardens. Now I’ve discovered that one is expected to do fall cleaning, too, in order to prepare the outside for frigid temperatures and the inside for the imminent cold and flu season. Sigh.

No rest for the weary. (Amazon)

The drudgery of housework is a task that throughout history has fallen on the shoulders of women. In the past, ladies (if they were fortunate, assisted by a maid or two) would shoo away the menfolk and empty the house during spring cleaning to scrub nooks and corners, beat the dust out of rugs, and wash soot and grime (heating and cooking with wood and coal was messy) from the walls.

In keeping with tradition, when I clean, my own hubby does what the man of the house has done for centuries. He leaves. This is probably for the best. Otherwise, I’d be dealing with remarks such as “Where does this go?” “What time is lunch?” And horrifically, “I’m going to adjust the motor on the vacuum cleaner to see if it’ll suck up the bucket of water I spilled.”

I’m a list maker, probably because it’s so visually satisfying to cross items off as I complete them. A list requires only two things: paper and pencil. But if you want to get fancy and pick up a few fall cleaning suggestions in the bargain, there are plenty of templates on line. Click HERE for great ideas plus free templates from the Organized Home.

You may have guessed I’m not a huge fan of cleaning, which in my opinion is a lot like trying to string beads when there isn’t any knot on the end. No matter how hard you’ve worked, within five minutes it will look like you haven’t touched a thing. That’s why I often choose to read a book instead. It’s so much more satisfying.

The perfect title for a non-perfectionist. (Pixabay)

But just in case you wonder, yes I do clean my house. A while back, I had someone come in to clean for me (delight of delights). Here’s what I learned from the experience:

1. Hiring cleaning help is an expensive luxury.

2. There is no reason whatsoever to clean weekly. Every other week works perfectly well.

Fall cleaning aside, there’s a list I don’t fail to study as it’s more important than simple household chores. The transition to fall and winter is the perfect time to check your home for safety issues. Click HERE to find several comprehensive lists (including free templates!) from Home Safety Smarkcheck.

Trust me, Hubby will not be shooed out of the house after I print out those lists.

Here’s the list, dear. (Pixabay)

I hope you’ve found some insights for all your fall projects. My own list has grown. Guess I’d better put down my book and get to work.

P.S. What’s for dinner? Check out the Easy-Peasy Recipe tab. A new recipe has been posted, courtesy of talented writer friend, Marcia Gaye. Visit her Facebook page HERE.

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Let’s Celebrate!

I’m convinced that we Americans have a love affair with celebration. Just a few days ago, we made a party out of viewing a total solar eclipse. Some peered through their flimsy cardboard glasses (looking like the audience at a 3-D movie) from the comfort of their own back yards, raising a toast to the sky. Others joined dozens or even hundreds of strangers in group events, many of which included music, drinks, and food.

It got me to thinking about our obsession with turning just about anything into a holiday. In the process of scouring the internet to satisfy my curiosity, I stumbled across every party-giver’s (and party-goer’s) dream. A site which provides multiple reasons to celebrate. Every. Single. Day.

Think about it. Never again will you be devastated over missing National Two Colored Shoes Day.

I admit to doing this more than once, although not on purpose.

Your heart will not be broken over letting National Leave the Office Early Day slip by unnoticed.

Crickets.

You can even rest assured you’ll not miss out on one single moment of National Wiggle Your Toes Day.

The antidote to National Two Different Colored Shoes Day.

So with no further ado, here it is. The place which will forever change your ability to party at the drop of a hat (especially if you enjoy National Drop Your Hat Day). Click HERE to access the National Day Calendar. As a bonus, the site even provides a meme for the chosen celebration, and a little history on the reason behind establishing it. This will enable you to sound wise as Solomon any time you discuss National Cream Filled Doughnut Day.

Now I’m off to begin my own celebration with a sweet treat. Didn’t you know August 23 is National Sponge Cake Day?

Yum!

 

 

 

 

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The Celestial Show

There’s nothing like August for celestial events.  It brings us the annual Perseid meteor shower, which peaks in my area August 12-13. Viewing the fun requires staying up past midnight, and is best enjoyed in an area where no “light pollution” dilutes the darkness. But seeing meteors whiz through the sky is worth it.

Perseid meteor August, 2016 in West Virginia. (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

As a matter of fact, many days there are interesting things happening above our heads. Keeping track of it all isn’t easy. Luckily, NASA has a Sky Events Calendar that can give you the information you need for what’s happening. Click HERE for the link to the sky show in your area.

Speaking of a show, you may have heard a word or two about the Big Kahuna event of the summer – a total solar eclipse. We haven’t had a contiguous solar eclipse in the United States since 1979 (I remember using the nail hole in a shoe box method to view it) but one is coming on August 21. People are flocking to places where the eclipse will last the longest, and one of those places is my home town. Nothing like fun in your own back yard for watching a major event, right?

But hey, don’t forget those solar glasses. I worried a bit about the flimsy-looking cardboard devices I’ve seen. After all, I don’t want my eyesballs fried like a couple of eggs in a pan. So what’s a person to do?

Make sure your glasses are NASA approved! (Carbondale Tourism photo)

Well, for one thing, make sure your glasses are NASA approved. Click HERE for a list of solar glasses that will keep your vision intact. Oh, and don’t forget, if you want to take pictures of the eclipse, additional safety precautions are also required for your camera or the lens will cook.

I know. There’s so much to remember. For a nice concise roundup of dates, times, places, and procedures, NASA has set up a solar eclipse site to answer all your questions. Click HERE to learn from the professionals how to safely enjoy this sure-to-be-amazing experience.

In my digging for solar eclipse information, I ran across an interesting image (and story). On July 28, 1851, Johann F. Berkowski became the first person to successfully photograph a solar eclipse. Berkowski, considered one of Prussia’s most skilled daguerreotypists, was commissioned by the Royal Prussian Observatory. He captured an image of the sun by attaching a telescope to a heliometer, and making an eighty-four second exposure. His exacting efforts (no second chances when making a daguerreotype of a total solar eclipse) got him an amazing shot, and a place in history.

July, 1851-Pretty cool, huh? (J. Berkowski/Wikipedia Commons)

No matter your plans for the upcoming eclipse, I’m sure it will be an event to remember. I’ve even heard animal behavior could be affected by the “black-out”. Personally, I plan to keep an eagle eye on my critters. If they act any weirder than they normally do, I’ll let you know.

A final note: There’s a new recipe posted, courtesy of friend and fellow-writer, Lynn Obermoeller. You’ll have plenty of time to prepare for the Big Kahuna Event and still eat well with an easy-peasy plate of Crock Pot Chicken.

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Books, Books, Books

Its summertime, and people are scrabbling to find the perfect book to read while on vacation. If you choose books the way I do, this isn’t an easy process. I’ve got to look at the cover, review the blurb on the back, and read the first page. Something has to grab me, or its back on the shelf and I pull out the next one.

My tastes are pretty eclectic. Historical fiction, romantic comedy, and biography usually top the list for me. If any of these appeal to you, you’re in luck. I’m going to share some of my favorites from over the last few months. Favorites as in they kept me up late at night. Maybe you’ll find your perfect summer (or fall, or winter) read among them.

Are you in the mood for a book that makes you smile? On Second Thought, by Kristan Higgins will fit the bill nicely. Two sisters tell their stories in alternating chapters. One sister is ever-hopeful her long time wedding-reluctant boyfriend will finally pop the question. She envies her sister who’s already married the “perfect” man. But after the perfect man dies in a freak accident, secrets are bound to be uncovered. You might wonder how Ms. Higgins can add humor to such a story line. Don’t fret, she delivers. In fact, this book hooked me so thoroughly, I’ve read six of her other books.

Have you ever been curious about the author, F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife Zelda? If so, I suggest reading Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald by Therese Anne Fowler. As a young girl, Zelda marries Scott and the two soon become the golden couple of the Jazz Age – until they’re each forced to confront their own demons. I devoured this book because I love imagining the stories wives could tell about their famous husbands. It feels a little bit like reading a diary. 🙂

The last book I’ll mention today is the one I’m currently reading and loving enough to have contracted a bad case of insomnia over it. The Alice Network by Kate Quinn has destroyed my normal bedtime routine because I keep turning the pages to find out what happens next. It’s a split story – half of it takes place in 1947 and the other half in 1915, featuring the tales of two very different women that intertwine in an unforgettable way. I don’t know the ending yet, but if its like the rest of the book – well, I suggest you read it for yourself and find out.

I share more of my favorite books on Goodreads. If you’re on Goodreads too, I’d love it if we can connect. Click here to find me.

BREAKING NEWS: Maybe you noticed I’ve tweaked my website pages. Please check them out and let me know what you think. I’m especially excited about my Easy-Peasy Recipes for Reluctant Cooks (like me). I’ll be adding to this page on a regular basis and hope you enjoy trying out something yummy that doesn’t require hours (or even very many minutes) of slaving in the kitchen. I’d rather be reading, wouldn’t you?

By the way, if you have an easy-peasy recipe you’d like to share, feel free to send it via my Contact Me page and I can add your contribution to the collection.

I’m also planning some cool giveaways in the near future for subscribers, so please sign up if you haven’t already done so (the form is located on the sidebar). I don’t want you to miss out on the fun.

Until next time, happy reading!

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A Six-Scoop Summer

Bears may hibernate during the winter, but I hibernate when the temperature (or heat index) climbs into triple digits.  Lately, my air-conditioned house has been my sanctuary since we’re deep in the heavy, mucky air of summer.  I’m grateful to close the blinds, turn off lights, and sit in front of my computer, pretending its not 100 degrees outside. This situation lends itself to all sorts of woolgathering.

When I’m not dreaming about the crisp cool air of fall, I find myself hunting useless pieces of trivia. For example, what’s the hottest day on record?

Turns out that “honor” goes to Furnace Creek in California’s Death Valley. (The names alone are enough to make me sweat.) On July 10, 1913, Furnace Creek heated up to 134 degrees. But I’m sure it was a dry heat, so no worries. Furnace Creek isn’t a stranger to fiery temperatures, so the area is closed to visitors during the hottest times of the year. Heat lovers rejoice! There is a nearby golf course that holds an annual tournament called the Heatstroke Open. I won’t be attending.

Furnace Creek, circa 1871. Looks delightful, right? (U.S. National Archives & Records Administration)

The old picture I found of Furnace Creek led me to think about how people handled extreme heat in the past. No air-conditioner or even an electric fan. The men wore long sleeves, long pants, and boots. And the women, well, in my opinion, the women had it worst of all. Layers of clothing, dresses that hung to the floor, and on a Saturday-night-out, a lady would add a corset. Then there’s the fun of standing over a fire to cook while your face turns the color of a ripe tomato.

About the best way they had to cope (short of a vacation to a cooler climate) would be to build the homestead in shade trees with a porch for sitting and sleeping. Someone might even sneak to the pond for a swim when no one was looking, and a paper fan would help to swish the hot air around if there wasn’t a breeze.

When you consider remedies like that, I really shouldn’t whine about the heat.  In today’s world, I’ve got it pretty darn good wearing my shorts and sitting near the A/C vent.  The entire summer-thing looks even better when you consider the other frosty and delicious way I keep cool.

This is definitely a six-scoop summer.

How about you? Are you hibernating too?

 

 

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