A few months ago, and with fingers crossed, I submitted a manuscript to a publisher in hopes they might consider taking it. I’d been playing with the story since 2010 – nearly seven years. Don’t misunderstand me, I love doing research and writing. But at some point, you have to finish what you start – and once a story is finished, wouldn’t it be nice if someone (other than your patient critique group) reads it? Even so, when I finally got the nerve to press the “send” button, I felt a little like a newbie actor must when trying out for the lead role in a play. Could they possibly pick me?

After waiting and sweating and chewing my fingernails to nubs, last week I heard from Amphorae Publishing Group. I’m thrilled to say, they offered me a contract for my novel, tentatively titled I Am Mrs. Jesse James.

Me putting my signature on the (undotted) line.

As soon as the terms were finalized, I jumped straight to social media. Publishing one little book isn’t such a big deal for the Stephen Kings among us. For me, it felt like an Academy Award nomination. So, I posted an announcement and said I’d write a blog post after the news had time to sink in.

Truth is, I’m not sure it’s sunk in even yet.

Maybe this has to do with the time and effort it takes to write a book. I’m not a speed-writer, especially when it comes to a work of historical fiction. To prepare for I Am Mrs. Jesse James, I’ve read more books, articles, newspaper clippings, maps, census reports, and opinion pieces on the James family and their nineteenth century world than I can count.

One may think, what’s the big deal? Review the research and get on with the story. Let me tell you what happens. After crafting a lovely little line about – for example – a ceramic bowl, fingers poise. Wait a minute? Did they have ceramic bowls in  1873? Then hours are lost to fact-checking ceramic bowls because there are tons of fascinating articles (with pictures!) on the history of ceramic bowls.  Then there’s the date you aren’t quite sure about, and need to verify, whereupon a brand new piece of information is discovered, requiring a previous chapter to be rewritten.

This is called chasing down a rabbit hole, and is a very effective way to lose time. I’ve really mastered the art of chasing down rabbit holes.

Here’s some of my material for this book. Sometimes locating a detail can be a tad challenging.

Further complicating matters, some sources were contradictory, and many pieces to the puzzle of Jesse James and his wife, Zee, were just plain missing. This shouldn’t come as a surprise. People who are on the run tend not to leave behind a helpful record of where they went, who they talked to, or what they did. So, I waded through the available material and brought to life Zee’s story based on what I learned about her.

After writing the first draft and revising it a bazillion times, off it went to my editor for her eagle eye to find any mistakes. Then I pored over the whole thing again. When I finally believed it to be ready, I sent the manuscript to the Amphorae Publishing Group – and here we are.

The contract is now complete, but guess what? I’m still revising, because there is one true statement about writing. Any work can always be made better.

You might say April the giraffe’s recent mind-numbing experience is similar to the work of a writer. It takes a long time to birth a book.

Watch for my book baby to be “born” sometime in mid-2018.  I hope you’re looking forward to the ride as much as I am.

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